3.9.10

Arles

I have already made posts on Arles (last year…), especially referring to its long history (Greek, Roman…), to Vincent van Gogh… , but as this was the last place visited during the summer holidays and to make a complete report, before returning to my normal Paris posts, here is a bit more.

It’s logical that Arles offers a - modern - museum to cover its long history. Since recently the museum proposes a collection of what the last years have been discovered in the Rhone River - which crosses the city. The most remarkable find is probably the marble bust of Julius Caesar. Modern techniques allow giving such precise indications that the bust can be dated to 46 BC. It’s supposed to be the only remaining bust of Julius Caesar made during his lifetime.

The Archeological Museum where the bust now is exhibited is situated at the short end of what once was a Roman Circus (see the red arrows). Hardly anything remains of the Circus, contrary to the Roman Arenas, the Theatre, the Baths … still partly there. Among hundreds of statues and other objects exposed at the museum, you may also notice some extremely well preserved mosaic floors.
Arles presents this year for the 41st time its annual International Photography Festival (“Les Rencontres d’Arles”), considered as the world’s most important event on photography. Photos are exhibited in some 30 different spots in the city. Several expositions take place in some old railway workshops which will be further transformed during the next years and to become an International Photo and Image Centre. Frank Gehry is taking care of the architecture. (Photo from the official presentation of the project.)


Some pictures from the Church of Saint Trophime (12th – 15th century). In 1178, the Emperor of the Roman Empire, Frederick Barbarossa, was crowned in the church, then considered as a Cathedral; today just a beautiful parish church.
… and at last some pictures from the city, its inhabitants and visitors.



I wish you a nice weekend!

25 comments:

Colette said...

Thank you very much Peter for this informative and inspiring insight to Arles..kind regards Colette ~_South Africa

joanny said...

Peter

Thank you for this interesting walk about using your camera lens as our tour guide. So many fascinating photo's, I will have to come back and visit them again.

Cheers,
Joanny

ParisBreakfasts said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ParisBreakfasts said...

Cute girls...
They look Swedish from the back...

Thérèse said...

So interesting Peter.
Lucky you!
Have a nice weekend.

Bagman and Butler said...

I've always been such a fan of your architecture shots, I didn't realize until now how good you are with candids of people. The photo of the women looking at photos should framed and hanging in front of them.

claude said...

Le Papa de ma Nièce Alex était originaire d'Arles (et de Bulgarie, l'un n'empêchant pas l'autre)et je me souviens avoir visité la ville en sa compagnie et celle de mon ex. Nous y avions rencontré Manitas de Plata qui était un de ses amis. Il était ami aussi avec un certain César, qui ne s'appelait pas Jules, qui n'était pasq empereur mais sculpteur.
Merci pour la visite, Peter !

Leon and Sue Sims said...

Peter - You bring back memories.
We have visited Arles twice, 2006 and 2008. Love it but your blog has shown us places we missed. Guess we need to return.
Leon & Sue (Australia)
http://melbourneourhome.blogspot.com/

Brookville Daily Photo said...

I read, yesterday, the highest paid sportsman in history was a chariot driver in Rome whose wealth was higher than anybody living today. He was a multi billionaire.

Your chariot race track reminded me of that. It is an amazing set of photographs down to the two girls, one of who is trying to look like she is from Peru, and just landed in your fair city.

BLOGitse said...

What a rich post!
Great info and beautiful pictures...
Have a great weekend!

ps. thank you for Name/URL option to leave a comment!

V Rakesh said...

Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!

sonia a. mascaro said...

Peter, I learn always when I visit your blog. Great photos too.

Thank you for your congratulations to my daughter. Sofia and me appreciate your nice words so much.

I wish you a nice weekend too!

Cezar and Léia said...

Dear Peter,
First of all congratulations, your post is wonderful!
Very interesting exposition about photography, lucky you!I also love your idea with people, kids, and moments in these collages.
Have a beautiful weekend,
hugs
Léia

Starman said...

We need to visit Arles one day.
Hola desde Barcelona.

Paris Paul said...

I love the shot of the young lady with the rainbow umbrella! i so need to visit Arles for the Van Gogh aspects. Is there more to see there than just the church?

JM said...

Very interesting post with a fantastic shot on top!

Catherine said...

beautiful photos as usual - I would love to visit this town..

Ruth said...

I agree with B&B that your people shots are wonderful, and you rarely show them, I know you are very considerate. The photographs exhibit is really something, I didn't realize this happened in Arles. And that bust of Julius Caesar, what an amazing relic. When we lived in Istanbul and traveled to Ephesus and other ancient cities, we were surprised at how much of the Roman ruins were still evident and accessible.

Lovely post on a place I would very much like to visit.

Kate said...

Peter, Strolling with you through the streets of whatever city you are in always is such a pleasure. I envy your opportunities to visit so many lovely places and your home base in Paris. Although I appreciate the photos and commentary of the architectural wonders, I really love the people portraits. The woman in the hat!! What fun!

Ian said...

Arles was a settlement for veteran Roman soldiers particularly....
Legio VI Ferrata: one of the Roman legions. Its name means 'ironclad', which is probably a reference to the suits of armor.
This legion was recruited in 52 BCE by Julius Caesar in Gallia Cisalpina, and saw its first action during the campaign against the Gallic leader Vercingetorix, who was besieged at Alesia. Later, it was stationed during the winter at Châlons-sur-Saône or Mâcon. In 51, the ironclads fought against the Carnutes of the lower Loire, and were sent to Orléans.
During the civil war between Caesar and his fellow-triumvir and Pompey the Great, the Sixth was the most mobile of all units. It fought in Hispania in the battle of Ilerda (summer 49), returned to the east, and served atDyrrhachium in the first months of 48. It was present in the battle ofPharsalus (9 August 48), accompanied Caesar to Alexandria (48/47), and decided the battle of Zela (2 August 47) in Pontus. After these campaigns, in which the Sixth suffered heavily, the dictator sent it sent back to Italy, from where veterans were settled at Arles, which was called Colonia Iulia Paterna Arelatensium Sextanorum, "the ancestral Julian colony of Arles of the soldiers of the Sixth".
Nice photographs.

Michael Mattison said...

Sensory overload in the most positive of senses -- kudos on a great atmospheric blog, Peter. Glad to have found you.
All the best,
Michael

Thérèse said...

I missed you too this year being in Paris when you were not... perhaps next year...

Jeanie said...

Well, Peter, I'm catching up and finding beautiful things from Arles and also the Ganesh post. I've missed you -- and also my own "away from blog" period. It's good to be back!

Trotter said...

No wonder Vincent got lost here!!

Nathalie said...

Peter ça fait une éternité que je n'ai pas laissé de commentaire sur ton blog, trop pressée par les vacances d'abord puis par la rentrée, mais quel régal de retrouver tes billets.

Je regrette que certaines de tes photos soient perdues dans les montages car il y a de véritables trésors dans le lot : la dame au chapeau jaune, la jeune asiatique accroupie sous son parapluie (parasol) multicolore... génial !

Comme toujours ça donne envie de se balader avec toi !