12.5.11

Grenelle (1)

I don't know hat happened, but this post was published May 12, got some comments, disappeared, lost its comments... Now published again, May 13 late.

I noticed that after some four years of blogging about Paris, I had not yet published anything about this part of the 15th arrondissement, referred to as Grenelle. Until the 19th century this was a more or less unexploited area not yet part of Paris , even hardly used as farm land. Then, a certain Mr. Violet (and some associates) bought the land and started to have it exploited. We are then actually talking about the area south of the border represented by the red dotted line on the plan here below; north of it was already Paris. The Paris border was until 1860 situated where we today at some places, like here, can see an over-ground part of the metro (see top photo with Invalides in the background) and where we those days would find the wall “Fermiers Généraux” (tax farmers) (see previous post). Grenelle as well as other villages around Paris (Montmartre, Batignolles, Belleville, Charonne….) became thus in 1860 part of the growing Paris and the wall disappeared.
Mr. Violet allotted the area in a very rectangular way, something we hardly find elsewhere in Paris. The reason was of course that we were on virgin land and that no older roads or streets influenced the planning. For himself, he built a little "castle", rather soon transformed into a fire station. In front of the station is a very nice example of the special red lamps that you generally find in front of these stations.
What you may consider as one of the major streets is Rue de Commerce with Place de Commerce, a little square with a building which was the “town hall” until Grenelle became part of Paris and the 15th arrondissement.
Along the street you can also find the “Café de Commerce”, a three story brasserie, which opened in 1921.
There are still a lot of the original buildings around in the area and a surprising number of little squares.
I took also some photos behind some closed gates, but I’m not indicating the addresses; people who live there prefer of course not to have too many “tourists” around.
There are some more remarkable buildings and monuments to be found, but I will revert on that in a later post.

22 comments:

Julie said...

I got as far as the Grenelle markets in the centre of the boulevard in my recent stay in Paris. That 1921 brasserie looks fascinating as does the Eglise Saint-Jean-Baptiste.

My flaneur-list for my next stay will be very long at this rate!

Virginia said...

Les lanternes rouges made me swoon! :) Oh , next trip!!!
V

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

I have not ventured into this area but your tour has given me some ideas for my next visit... Love the red lanterns and the little parks... le sigh!

Bises,
Genie

Olivier said...

j'aime surtout la petite cours, j'aime ce cote de Paris

Adam said...

This is a nice area, with still something of a 'village' feel in certain areas. The Cafe de Commerce is also very good given its size - some of the best 'frites' you'll find anywhere in Paris!

Thérèse said...

Un Paris tel qu'on l'aime ou tel que je l'aime plutôt.

Espana said...

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M said...

Tempting area to put on "the list" -- Love the pompier lanterns, and the parks and courtyards.

I hope this means your camera is healthy again?

Studio at the Farm said...

Interesting . I am surprised the area was not developed earlier. Thank you, Peter, for the excellent post.

Synne said...

This looks like a lovely area!

Starman said...

Imagine my surprise when I clicked on your site and found you had written TWO posts inn ONE week! I like the 15e and I will definitely check out the Café de Commerce. Perhaps we can raise a glass there together this summer?

ALAIN said...

Un quartier célèbre dans toute la France depuis le "Grenelle" de l'environnement ! (qui comme chacun sait a accouché d'une souris)

Simony said...

I love the feeling of a little village this area presents. Must be a peaceful place to live!
Is there any place in Paris that is not good to live?

claude said...

Merci Peter, pour cette visite. Bien la lampe rouge des Sapeurs Pompiers.
Grenelle semble un endroit plaisant de Paris.
Je devais y aller et puis je n' y vais plus et je ne sais quand maintenant je pourrai y retourner

J Bar said...

Terrific shots.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Jeanie said...

I just love peering behind the closed gates! This looks like a lovely neighborhood -- I particularly find the firepost lamp lovely!

I'm curious if this is considered a safe neighborhood or a youthful (or aging) one, those kinds of things. It certainly looks beautiful.

northsidephil said...

On my first trip to Paris in 2007 I was looking for an address on Rue Grenelle on Blvd Grenelle. Chicago eliminated duplicate St. names years ago, so one must remember Blvd Grenelle has the "L" tracks on it. They seem to appear in every film made in Paris.

Trotter said...

Hi Peter! Grenelle deserved a post!! A the Café du Commerce a visit.... ;)

After the Blogger calamity this week, Blogtrotter Two is showing the last post on Amsterdam 2010... Enjoy and have a superb Sunday and week ahead!!

arabesque said...

i always love it when you visit quiet walks down the road.
there's always something interesting to see.
yes, blogger went a bit loco last week, mine was also down, but thankfully back to normal again. ^0^

meanwhile, will patiently wait for more of your post.

sonia a. mascaro said...

Nice place, Peter! The bandstand (coreto in Portuguese) is so pretty!

I had the same probem with Blogger. The comments vanish,disappeared... And I could not leave a comment too.

sonia a. mascaro said...

Ops! I mean "same problem".

hpy said...

C'était un quartier agréable.