13.6.11

"Arts et Métiers"

In my preceding post I promised to come back with a new visit to what used to be the Saint-Martin-in-the Fields (Saint-Martin-aux-Champs) Abbey with origins well before the year 1000. I already posted about the “Arts et Métiers” museum, which today occupies part of what used to be the abbey. The Revolution of course made an end to the religious activities here. The National Conservatory for Arts and Crafts, referred to as "Arts et Métiers" was created and in 1798 started educating technology and different engineering sciences here and so still does. The museum activities (see previous post) started in 1802. Today, I will concentrate on the non-museum-buildings. Most of them have been added during the latter part of the 19th century, but I think it’s interesting to find what remains from the abbey times.

I tried here to describe this by comparing a 1739 plan of Paris with today’s Google Earth.
Remain the Saint Martin Church (1), which today is part of the museum (see again previous post), the Saint Nicolas Church (2), now on the other side of the street (Rue Réaumur) (see previous post) and the abbey refectory (3), which today is the school library. We can also find traces of what used to be the 12th century towers and the walls surrounding the abbey, (4), (5) and (6), the latter now hidden in a building, again on the other side of the street (see previous post).
Although not as spectacular as the Sainte Chapelle (see previous post), the 13th century refectory, the present library, could according to some sources have the architect in common – Pierre de Montreuil. See top photo.
Here are some other photos from the present “school part”, including from the almost empty café.
A professional photographer with assistants obviously used the premises for some fashion shots.

20 comments:

Catherine said...

very informative - great architectural shots and I love the fashion shoot at the end...greetings from Mexico...

Owen said...

Hi Peter ! How are you ? I haven't meant to stay away for so long, but have been having a worse than busy time between work and taxes and what not... haven't been able to get out and about nearly as much as I'd like to lately.

I love how you compared the old map of Paris with the current Google maps, and then placed the photos of buildings on the map ; very fine way to help us see where all of this is. When we were living in Paris, we were not too far from here. Funny fashion shot there, I got a little of that at the Prix de Diane today too.

Hope all is well with you...

Starman said...

Another excellent post. I've now added Musée des Arts et Métiers as a must see for our next trip.

Studio at the Farm said...

A great post, Peter. What a wonderful conglomeration of old buildings!

Thirtytwo degrees said...

I really appreciate the time and care you take to make all this meaningful to those of us who have not had the chance to see this yet. Thanks so much...this is a very exciting post imho. Great idea to show today with yesterday..thanks.

anla said...

Takker for informativ og kreativ blogg. Gamle kart og nye, imponerende. Jeg har anbefalt denne bloggen til min datter, som også er Parisfan, akkurat som jeg..

Cezar and Léia said...

Amazing work in this post Peter, congratulations!
Oh, I want to go to Paris!
Léia

Adam said...

What is interesting to see on your before/after maps is the vandalism of Haussmann. Little has changed in that area really, but the Boulevard de Sébastopol obviously really hacked its way through a lot of old buildings!

Ash said...

Beautiful buildings and photos. Oh, and that fashion shoot looks very interesting.

Hope you're doing well, Peter.

Ruth said...

Another series of interesting buildings, that never seem to end in Paris. I wonder if you are learning too, as you go along, or if you know about it already, and only fill out the details for posts!

Ken said...

Awesome! This is the kind of post one would return to re-read again and again. Just love all this insider's info about your Paris. It's obvious you love and know your city.

Have a great day!

BLOGitse said...

After visiting Tuscany I understand how rich of history Europe is.
Beautiful post of yours again. Have a great week!

SusuPetal said...

That last picture is très chic!

Simony said...

The yellow bra calls as much attention as the architecture.
Paris is an amazing place to explore, with some unique people as well.

Pierre BOYER said...

Toujours intéressant...
Merci pour la visite,

Pierre

Claude said...

J'admire ton travail de recherche, Peter.
C'est fou ce que je peux apprendre sur ma ville en regardant ton blog.
Effectivement, c'est toujours intéressant quand on passe par chez toi.
Merci !

ParisBreakfasts said...

Is rue St,Denis really so close by?
I don't know this area at all.
Thanks Peter for the private tour.
Carolg

Trotter said...

Come on Peter, who is the professional here? ;))

arabesque said...

the inside is as beautiful as the outside. ^0^
nice interiors with a cozy ambiance.
i could stay there for hours.

btw, what was the fashion shoot for?

Jeanie said...

I must have missed your other post -- Arts and Metiers was a spot I wanted to visit and it just didn't play out. Off to the links!