11.2.13

Another walk around the 11th.



I have already made few posts, e.g. here and here, about alleys and backyards and especially the old industrial activities which you could find in the 11th arrondissement. Here is something more.

The top picture shows a building from 1881, which originally was a factory, Couesnon, once the world’s most important music instrument factory, especially known for its wind instruments. In 1936 it was sold to the important metallurgical syndicate, affiliated to the C.G.T. (General Confederation of Labour) and became known as “La Maison des Métallos”. When they decided to leave, the place was supposed to be demolished, but different local initiatives stopped this and finally the City of Paris took over the place and it’s now transformed into a cultural centre with theatres, workshops…



The next place – created 1870 - was originally a factory for barrels, where they started to use rubber plugs to increase the tightness. They learnt how to use the material and created rubber boots, in one piece, completely water-tight. In 1936 they created tennis shoes, under the name "Spring Court", Spring for the rubber resort and Court for the tennis court. Tens of millions of these in different shapes have since been manufactured, e.g. worn by John Lennon…, but the manufacturing has since the 1980’s moved to elsewhere. The old factory is now occupied by different offices, some photo studios   … and a small Spring Court shop.



The following ex-industrial building is the previous earthenware, faience, factory, “Faïencerie Loebnitz”, constructed in 1884. The architect is the same who designed the Printemps department store, Paul Sédille. There is an adjacent building which offered flats for the employees. The façade of the factory is decorated by four faience artworks, three of which were originally decorating a fine arts pavilion at the Paris World’s Fair in 1878 – a fourth one for the ceramics was added. The manufacturing left the premises during the 1930’s.



A last little thing: This little theatre, “Théâtre de Belleville”, with origins from 1850 and with changed names and past activities as bistro, music-hall… well-known in the area. It seems that a very young Maurice Chevalier, made his more or less unpaid débuts here, at the age of 13 or 14.



… and some odd photos from other squares, alleys and backyards.

            

15 comments:

French Girl in Seattle said...

What a fun post for me, Peter: I used to live in the 11th arrondissement of Paris in my 20s'. I had not seem most of the places you chose to highlight in your story, though, so it felt as if I was visiting a brand new place. Original and thorough work, as always. Bravo, le Suédois! Veronique (French Girl in Seattle)

ALAIN said...

C'est tout ce qui reste de la métallurgie Française.

Starman said...

Fabulous reporting and equally fabulous photos!

SusuPetal said...

John is so stylish with those tennis shoes!

Thérèse said...

Tous pour de bonnes causes mais je ne sais si c'est bénéfique à l'emploi!

Cezar and Léia said...

I love the gate 5!
A great article, very interesting post with beautiful images!
Léia

Anne in Oxfordshire said...

Hi Peter , I am happy that the building was not demolished, someone had some sense .. and how great for it to be put to good Use :-)

hpy said...

C'est vrai que des industries presque centre ville n'est pas un truc pratique, le problème c'est qu'il n'y en a plus en périphérie non plus.

Synne said...

Always extra fun to see photos from my own arrondissement! There are so many interesting buildings and backyards here!

Studio at the Farm said...

I love these side trips in the alleys of Paris. I feel I am getting to know the city vicariously, a bit.

Anonymous said...

I love your city...it's so beautiful...no matter where or how you photograph it!

Those faience panels took my breath away...

Mil gracias Peter.

claude said...

Ce aurait dommage que la Maison des Métallos soit détruite.
J'étais trop petite quand j'ai habité le 11è pour découvrir tout cela. Merci !

Cergie said...

Je ne sais plus où exactement je suis allée chercher des baguettes de laiton pour une table de chevet à rénover, mais mon artisan ébéniste d'Epinal a dû m'envoyer dans ce coin là (et j'y suis allée).
Beaucoup de petites fabriques auj disparues, j'ai une cafetière style bodum faite à Paris, j'imagine que c'est bodum qui a pompé sur ma cafetière plutôt que l'inverse....

Vagabonde said...

That is a very informative post – you have well researched it and we are benefiting from all your knowledge. Thanks Peter.

Jeanie said...

All of these buildings are so splendid but I have to say my favorite is that sweet little theatre. I rarely met a theatre that didn't capture my heart This one is charming!