24.5.10

... and even a bit more from the 18th arrondissement

Maybe a last look, for the moment, at the northern part of the 18th arrondissement? We are far down from Montmartre, but with a bit of luck you can see the top of Sacré Cœur appear (the red circle).

We are in another area which obviously needs restoration …
… which partly is ongoing.
The most remarkable building here is probably the apartment building you can see below, rue des Amiraux. According to a stacking principle with set-back terraces, all apartments have a lot of access to light. Under the apartments is a big swimming pool, which now is open to public. The facades are covered by white faïence tiles, still in good shape after some 70 years; the building stood ready in 1927. The architect is Henri Sauvage, who already created a similar building at rue Vanvin (6th arrondissement) in 1913, this time without swimming pool. I mentioned Sauvage also in a post about Avenue Victor Hugo and the gallery “Cité l’Argentine”.

12 comments:

Simony said...

Hello Peter,
I really like the apartments with the set back verandas. I agree they get more light that way.
But what is the first picture? The building with holes/doors? Abandoned?
See you later!

Virginia said...

Tha apartment complex reminds me of condos here in the U.S., especially at the beach. The balconies allow everyone a nice view! Another area of Paris I've not seen. Merci Peter for showing us ALL of Paris!
V

PS. Swedish Gym?? Hmmn :)

Owen said...

Love that abandoned facade several floors high. Not sure I'd want to stay in the Radium Hotel though !

Are there any streets of Paris you have not yet walked in ? I wonder...

Vagabonde said...

I like to look at all these old areas around Montmartre. Peter, have your read “Les Alumettes Suédoises” de Robert Sabatier? In it he talks about his childhood around Rue Labat, in the 18eme, métro Chateau Rouge which is the station before Marcadet Poissonière I kind of recall. I really enjoyed it, he talks about his childhood in the 30s, when the quartier was peopled with employés, petits commerçants, etc. You could find it in the Live de Poche. Of course the area is not the same anymore and I think Chateau Rouge is not a peculiarly safe area, but maybe during the day, it’s OK. I’d like to go there to take a look sometimes.

V Rakesh said...

Wow! Those apartments are wonderful, certainly great places to live I suppose!

Great pictures, as ever!

Trotter said...

Hi Peter! Gym Suedoise?

Sorry for the absence, but my computer broke down and I’ll be waiting a month for it to be fixed… ;-( Anyhow, I left you a post on the suburbs of Ephesus for you to enjoy. Have a great week!!

Thérèse said...

Tant qu'il y aura des vieilles pierres... Une bonne idée ces appartements en dégradé car quand on pense aux rez-de-chaussées parisiens... quel cafard!

Starman said...

I like that apartment building. There aren't enough places in Paris with balcons.

Vagabonde said...

Peter I’d like to ask you a question. I know you speak French so you may be able to help me or any of your readers. I have been in the US for many years but don’t know any French person here in Georgia. I have seen blogs galore, in English, on Paris and France, but what I am looking for is the reverse – blogs on for example, New York, Los Angeles or any other city here, but in French, so I could keep speaking French. I have looked but have not found any. Do you have any ideas?

claude said...

J'aime beaucoup l'immeubler avec les étages en retrait.
Je connais la rue vavin mais ne me rappelle pas de l'immeuble que tu montres.
Mon Chéri m'a appelé ce matin du boulot pour me dire que tu m'avais laissé un mail.
Je te réponds en messagerie ou sur messenger demain matin.

BLOGitse said...

Peter I have a question:
are dogs, their barking, a problem in Paris?
After two years in a compound city life in Casa sounds so 'barking' and 'furniture pushing' - I can't believe it!

BLOGitse

ParisBreakfasts said...

The 'setback' principle is from Corbusier - there must be 26 feet from the window, so every space gets light..well something like that. New York used to be that way, before the trend for straight-up buildings took over and now inner offices get no natural light.
I learned it in my NY City architecture class!