30.1.14

Passage Choiseul


I have made a number of posts on what is referred to as “passages”, sometimes as “galleries” (walkways?). Most of them were created during the first half of the 19th century. They were very fashionable - enabling to do shopping protected from sun and rain and with clean shoes - until new large, paved, boulevards and the first department stores took over during the latter part of the same century. At its peak, there were some 150 of them.

There are a number of narrow streets referred to as “passages” in Paris, but if I refer only to those which are covered by glass roofs or similar, I believe that today there are some 20 remaining.  Some of them have been brought back to fashion, some are more or less abandoned. Below, I give a list with a link to the different posts I once wrote about them.

I had not yet been reporting about Passage Choiseul, opened in 1827. It was somehow brought back to fashion in the 1970’s when Kenzo opened a boutique here (not there anymore). It’s not the most fancy of the Paris “passages”, but there are some nice shops, art galleries and the entrance to the “Théatre  des Bouffes Parisiennes”.


There are four entrances, one actually goes under the name “Sainte Anne”, with a long corridor – with hardly any visible activities – leading to rue Sainte Anne.





11 comments:

Studio at the Farm said...

How beautiful, and what a civilized idea for shopping. :)

french cravings said...

I love these pieces of Paris history and I make sure to visit at least one or two on every trip: my favorites so far are Vivienne, Véro-Dodat, and Colbert. Katie

Nadege said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Elizabeth Eiffel said...

Although I'm a frequent visitor to France, I tend to only pass through Paris due to time constraints, so I haven't yet had the pleasure of visiting these magical passages. However, they are now on my list when I dash throughout Paris again this year - hopefully I will be able to linger in the City of Light for a day longer. Warm regards

claude said...

Je ne pensais qu'il y en avait autant.
D'après les souvenirs de ma Maman, j'allais aux cours de dance classique dans le passage des Panoramas. Nous avions l'habitude d'aller dire bonjour à un tailleur juif au fond du passage.
Je vais cliquer sur ton lien.
Merci pour cette piqûre de rappel.

Jeanie said...

Rick and I found a passage on our first night in Paris -- somewhere on the left bank not too far from St. Michel/St. Germain. We were wandering around looking for a place to eat and couldn't find it again on a bet! I had no idea of their historical significance, but it was lovely -- rather elegant with some lovely shops and a restaurant or two where we didn't eat. Now I wish I'd noticed more!

Synne said...

I absolutely adore the Parisian passages, they feel like secret worlds of their own!

Alain said...

Bien loin des "galeries marchandes" des nouveaux "centres commerciaux".

Anonymous said...


¡Que belleza!

Maria

Starman said...

It's too bad someone felt the need to destroy so many of them. I hope at least a few will be preserved.

Alexa said...

When I lived in Paris in the '60s, I worked in a modeling agency in the Passage Choiseul. Thanks for bringing back some good memories, Peter!