8.3.18

Pavillon Marsan restored.



I sometimes report on things around Paris which would need repairs, restoration, refurbishing… With all historical landmarks, it’s obvious that it’s not an easy task to keep everything in perfect shape. Sometimes some donators are around, but in most cases we also talk about tax money. So, some kind of indulgence must be there, but also admiration when you look on the results of some restoration work. I just recently reported about the Saint-Germain-des-Prés church (see post here) and here we can admire the recently restored outside of the Louvre “Pavillon Marsan”.

The “Pavillon Marsan” has some origins from the time of Louis XIV and was actually more or less part of the Tuileries Palace which stood between the “Pavillon de Flore” and the “Pavillon de Marsan”,  which was set on fire by the “Commune” in 1871 and then was demolished. (Some “pieces” from the demolished Palace were saved and can be found here and there, one example is in the Tuileries Gardens.) I talked briefly about the Palace in a post 11 years ago - in my previous blog.) Below we can see what the “Pavillon de Marsan” looked like after the fire… It was rebuilt after 1874 and it was then slightly remodeled to look like its “sister”, the “Pavillon de Flore”.   

So… let us just admire…





5 comments:

Mystica said...

Thank you for the post. I cannot access FB for 72 hours as the government has cut down access on all social media. Even internet is really slow. So I am glad I saw this today.

lyliane said...

Très beau, il a été restauré aux couleurs de la Suède....

Jeanie said...

The restoration is beautiful. Makes the scaffolds they need to use while cleaning and repairing worthwhile in the end.

Rakesh Vanamali said...

Gorgeous pictures.

Anonymous said...


Indulgence? Which one of them? This word has many meanings ...
I have seen, recently, a few new buildings in Paris. And one more ugly than the other. And built with whose money?
When touring a city so famous for the beauty of its ancient monuments...there should be no room in our minds for the the words "desidia" and "tercermundista"...

But, of course, you're Peter Olson: always merciful and conciliatory.
And your photography is out of this world!
Maria