17.11.10

Anne Frank

Anne Frank wrote in her diary: “Nearly every morning I go to the attic to blow the stuffy air out of my lungs, from my favorite spot on the floor I look up at the blue sky and the bare chestnut tree, on whose branches little raindrops shine, appearing like silver, and at the seagulls and other birds as they glide on the wind. As long as this exists, I thought, and I may live to see it, this sunshine, the cloudless skies, while this lasts I cannot be unhappy.”

August 23 this year, the tree, some 150 years old, was blown down by a storm.

This little garden, Jardin Anne-Frank, was opened in 2007 and a graft from the Amsterdam tree was planted. It’s still very modest in size, but the buds indicate that it will be in bloom the coming spring.







To find this well hidden garden, you must be lucky, know about it or possibly be bringing your kids or grandkids to a doll museum, which is immediate neighbour to the park.
Of course November is not the moment to show the garden in its best shape. Sorry. Part of the present garden used to be the gardens of a big 17th century mansion, Hôtel de Saint-Agnan, still there and which now is a museum of Judaism history and another 17th century mansion, Hôtel de Montmor, where Descartes (Cartesius), Molière and others were guests.

Once again, looking for some details, I found these roses (and – you have to look closely - even a bee which had not yet given up).

36 comments:

Flartus said...

Oh my, how do you learn about these little treasures? I did not know of the tree being lost in Amsterdam but am gladdened to know that it continues on. Merci pour l'avoir partagé.

e said...

Another gorgeous post, and with great information! How did you get such close ups of the roses? While I am sad to learn of that tree being blown down, perhaps its Paris counterpart will thrive.

Mystica said...

I am so appreciative of the trouble you have taken to find out these little vignettes of Paris and educate us all! Thanks.

joanny said...

A wonderful story and excerpt from the diary of Anne Frank. You do a marvelous detailed work putting it all together, with the most magical and beautiful photography.

Joanny

Olivier said...

je connaissais pas ce jardin, mais c'est un bel hommage a Anne Franck

"All things French" said...

Bonjour Peter ~ a lovely post & what a positive little person Anne Frank was. A real inspiration.

ALAIN said...

Un jardin un peu caché, ce sont souvent les plus agréables.

Adam said...

I like this garden, but my son has already been told off there for playing on the grass. Grrrrr!

hpy said...

Inte blommor utan blad. Bladknoppar.

sonia a. mascaro said...

Peter, thanks for sharing with us this beautiful Jardin Anne-Frank!It's always a pleasure to know Paris through your hands...
Great photos too!

Penguin said...

That is an amazing story about Anne Frank's tree. So sad that it got blown down but such a statement of its resiliency that the graft is going to bloom!

Marie said...

Life goes on. I didn't know about the graft. I am always very much moved by what happened to the Jews during WWII. I am working on a book of testimonies written by Jews who fought against the nazis. Your photos are very beautiful.

Anonymous said...

Que c´est intéressant! Merci pour la découverte, je ne savais pas absolument de l´existence de ce petit joli jardin. On apprend toujours des nouvelles choses sur votre blog. Merci encore
Hana de Prague

✿ ♥ France ✿ ✿ said...

Bonjour que de belles roses et j'adore cette couleur
Merci pour ces photos elles sont si belles. Merci

Cergie said...

Je réalise, et ce n'est pas la première fois qu'on passe toujours au même endroit (j'avais tourné vers l'église St Augustin et les jardins des Halles une fois au lieu d'aller vers Beaubourg en sortant de la station de RER) et donc à coté de petits bijoux. A 1ère fvue je trouve que ce jardin ressemble à bien d'autres, cela vient des immeubles environnants qui le cloisonnent et des jeux qui sont partout les mêmes
Tu es allé au musée de la poupée ?
Et c'est pas une abeille mais un syrphe il me semble

wockley said...

What a gem of a place! Sorry to have missed visiting ther in October I'm sure the colours were beautiful!
I love your photos.

Studio at the Farm said...

Thank you, Peter, for another fascinating story of Paris. I will send it to my niece, who has been reading about Anne Frank.
[I found the bee]

Paris Paul said...

Wow! Yet another treasure I had no idea existed after all my 20 years in the city! I'll make sure to visit the park when the weather gets a little better, which will hopefully be before next August (lol). Thanks again for sharing your wonderful histories and photos, Peter!

Starman said...

Very interesting. I wonder if they planted any grafts in Amsterdam?

betsy said...

Always a joy to see your photos and to read your blog.

claude said...

Bonjour Peter !
Le journal d'Anne Frank, je l'ai lu et vu et revu le film. C'est bien qu'un petit jardin porte son nom. Je trouve l'idée de remplacer l'arbre abattu par une tempête très bonne. Les roses font de la résistance dans ce jardin.

Cezar and Léia said...

Bonjour Peter!
Ce jardin est très adorable!
Merci pour toutes les informations, je n'ai jamis visité lá ba, j'espère avoir l'occasion de visiter ce lieu à bientôt!
**Le mois dernier, quelqu'un a volé notre voiture ici à Luxembourg :( Incroyable! Enfin, no voyages maintenant, mais j'espère avoir une nouvelle voiture a bientôt pour aller à Paris!
Léia :)

Ilka von Torok said...

nice photos!

Ash said...

Wonderful photos and information. Thanks for sharing these, Peter!

Catherine said...

Souhaitons que les jardiniers prennent grand soin du marronnier qui donna ses derniers souffles de liberté à Anne Frank.... Plus de "soin" qu'elle n'en reçut elle-même, malheureusement.

Trotter said...

That tree will last forever...

V Rakesh said...

Thank you for posting this! I have read her diary and feel that it has no equal in the manner it articulates thoughts and emotion!

Nathalie said...

Belle évocation d'Anne Franck - je ne connaissais pas l'histoire de l'arbre !

Marie-Noyale said...

J'adore ce dernier souffle de printemps avec ces roses.
Tu nous montreras le musee de la Poupee? mon ame de petite fille aime rever!!!

Wholesale Childrens Clothing said...

The plants there are big and fun to look at. It also have different types of flowers you can appriciate.

Treat Colic said...

This park has hidden gems on it that you just want to look at and be amazed of the plants that are larger than those we commonly see.

Liveaboard Charter said...

Plant lovers will surely be in awe with the different species it has.

Liveaboard Charter said...

Plant lovers will surely be in awe with the different species it has.

traders international said...

Its good to know that there are places where unique plants are planted.

hersh shefrin said...

Hope that more parks are made with this plants so people will know more about plants that larger than the plants we usually see.

faith f. said...

Pictures seems alive. Oh so lovely!

- faith