4.4.11

Caillebotte - Jacquemart-André Museum




What used to be the private home (1875) of the very wealthy Edouard André (1833-94) and his wife Nélie Jacquemart (1841-1912), a painter, was bequeathed to the “French Institute” (Institut de France, grouping the five academies  and managing some thousand foundations, museums, castles…).  Their previous home is now known as the Jacquemart-André Museum. It’s incredibly decorated inside (see top photo) and as the couple was fervent art collectors it contains also an important number of paintings and other pieces of art by e.g. Chardin, Boucher, Fragonard, Vigée-Lebrun, J-L David, Bellini, Botticelli, Canaletto, Donatello, Van Dyck, Hals, Rembrandt, della Robbia, Tepolo, Ucello….
It’s also a place for temporary exhibitions, like the one now ongoing about Gustave Caillebotte and his brother Martial. The better known one, Gustave (1848-94), was an impressionist painter (although he often painted in a more realistic manner). He was wealthy, participated but also sponsored several of the impressionist exhibitions and helped the other impressionist painters in many ways, including buying a large number of their paintings. During his short life (he died at 46) he had also the time to be an excellent yachtsman (designing his own boats), and philatelist, gardener... It took some time before he obtained the same reputation as his impressionist colleagues, but his paintings are now sold for millions of Euros or Dollars. Although he is presented in some of the major museums (especially Musée d’Orsay), a large part is still to be found in private collections. The present exhibition (no photos allowed) is thus an excellent opportunity to see tens of his paintings.
As we can see below, he painted often portraits, scenes from Paris, yachts, the garden in his home close to Paris (the lady with the roses is his long time mistress – he never married)...
Gustave lived with his brother Martial (1853-1910) until Martial married. They shared several passions, including yachting, photography, philately… , but Martial was especially a very good pianist and he also composed. We can see the brothers here; a self-portrait by Gustave, a photo of the two and a painting by Gustave of his brother at the piano. (If someone is more interested in Martial’s music, I could recommend this site - in French).

The present exhibition also shows a number of photos by Martial.


Many of the impressionist painters were thus very close friends to the two brothers, obviously more particularly Monet and Renoir (who both had been financially much helped by Gustave). Here is a photo of Martial’s two children , also painted by Renoir.


Gustave Caillebotte appears also on Renoir’s famous “Luncheon of the Boating Party” (see previous post – he’s the one in front on the right.)
In his will, Gustave donated a collection of 68 impressionist paintings to the French government. He had asked Renoir to be the executor. At Gustave’s death the impressionists had not yet today’s esteem and Renoir had to negotiate against a certain more classical resistance, referring to lack of space at the museum where the then living artists were exposed (Luxembourg). Despite several later attempts, finally almost half of the collection was refused.  Below we can see what Gustave Caillebotte saved for our common pleasure, including some of the today’s best known impressionist works … and what was refused. Most of the refused ones are today in private ownership and many are even “lost”, somewhere, and we don’t even know what they look(ed) like.  










This is where you can find the museum and the exhibition (until July 11, 2011).   














33 comments:

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Peter, it is amazing what time does to our perception of art and its value... How sad that we do not even know where those "refused" items are or if they even still exist.

Being a map-girl I always appreciate the location of your stories. I love this one with the stories of Gustafe and Martial. Thank you for showing that photo side-by-side with the Renoir of Martial's girls.

See you in about a week!

Bises,
Genie

Virginia said...

Peter, I loved seeing this museum with you. Thank you for suggesting it as I would have not known! Your top photo is just marvelous. I enjoyed a trip back through this museum today! As always you show us show much and give us such rich details.
V

M said...

Peter, I am looking forward to seeing you and to visiting this museum with Genie.

V Rakesh said...

This certainly couldn't have been a better post really for all the marvelous research that has gone into making this!

I so very much hope that you publish a book with all of your posts in it!

And, as for me, in this side of the world, there couldn't have been a better start to this week!

Dianne said...

I love this post Peter especially as Gustave is one of my favourite impressionist painters. I visited his grave in Pere Laschaise and then viewed some of his works at Musee d'Orsay - Thank you for the information about his brother. I'm now clicking over to check out "The Boating Party" - didn't realise that was Gustave in Renoir's painting.
Have a wonderful spring day.

Olivier said...

magnifique ce musée, une promenade très intéressante.

Vagabonde said...

I remember going to this museum about eight years ago on a Sunday, in winter, and there was hardly any one there. I’d love to see the Caillebotte exhibit but you mention that no pictures can be taken. There are so many museums to see, parcs, streets for “flâner” and so little time… It will be hard to decide what to do when I am there in a couple of weeks.

shege said...

L'armour de antique, bon reves !

ALAIN said...

Beaucoup de choses dans ton message. C'est curieux de voir combien les photos de Martial ressemblent aux tableaux de son frère.

Synne said...

How very interesting! Impressionism is my favourite artistic movement. Thanks!

Nathalie said...

Peter, voilà un billet fabuleux. Déjà ta visite du musée et de l'expo temporaire dédiée aux frères Caillebotte est passionnante mais ta liste des oeuvres impressionnistes acceptées et refusées laisse pantois !
Merci pour ce beau travail de recherche et de documentation, c'est absolument passionnant !

Ruth said...

This is a beautiful and informative exhibition in your post. I do love Gustave Caillebotte's work, of course. It is also always interesting to see these early photographs and hear about the connections with other artist-celebrities, in the context of the time when they were not "worshipped" as they are now.

Thank you for the extra [considerable] effort of the displays of accepted and rejected works. Quite fascinating.

alice said...

Cela fait déjà longtemps que je veux visiter ce musée mais l'occasion ne s'est pas encore présentée... Toujours aussi documenté, ce blog! Bises.

Bettina said...

Once again thank you for great photos and wonderful information. You're doing such a huge job and it's very much appreciated ;o)

Adam said...

Definitely a museum and exhibition worth visiting, but even more so with the information that you have given us here. Thanks!

Delphinium said...

Bon, je ne savais pas que la martial jouait du piano et avait composé. Finalement pour apprendre des nouveaux trucs, on vient sur le blog de peter, mais finalement, ne voudrais-tu pas ouvrir un salon? et on viendrait boire le champagne chez toi? du style tous les jeudis soir? ce serait les jeudi soir de peter.

Allez, steuplé

Jane said...

Let us do our best to preserve the beauty that is the product of both man and nature.

Please check out this video for World Water Day tips: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGxDAHkt4ok

hpy said...

Det ar egentligen riktigt bra att jag aldrig besokte alla muséer u Paris, jag hade inte mera haft nagon orsak att besoka din blogg!
(Jobbiga dagar, hinner knappast blogga alls.)

Studio at the Farm said...

Peter, I think I enjoyed this post more than any other [though you know they are all fascinating] Imagine living in that gorgeous home, surrounded by all that wonderfully beautiful art!

Harriet said...

This is one of my favorite museums - loved seeing the photos. The info about the special exhibit is so informative. Thanks you for sharing so much about Paris with us.

Starman said...

One wonders, did they just arbitrarily decided which would go in and which would not?

ParisBreakfasts said...

I love your first photo especially!
You really did justice to the exhibit as well as all it's historical aspects.
BRAVO!

Carolg

claude said...

Je dirai la même chose que Nathalie.
C'est un véritable travail de recherce et ce post est for intéressant.
Sauf que la traduction française a planté ma connection.

You're My City said...

Great!!:D Paris is a home of impressionism. I love to see the city through these painting... vibrant color, rich emotions in every object and light...oh,I'm so adiccted to those paintings...Your art posts always make me feel happy, thank u so much!

Shionge said...

Yoooohooooo Peter...my gf flew to Paris last weekend and bet she is exploring the city now before venturing out to the South :)

I have too little time in Seville and so many many things to do and see so there.... :)

JM said...

The interiors are absolutely beautiful! The room on top is my favorite shot and I think it's yours too! :-)

James said...

Great post Peter!
I have fond memories of the Jacquemart-André Museum and they would be even better had I seen such a wonderful exhibit.

It's a great place to enjoy lunch too.

sonia a. mascaro said...

What a beautiful and informative exhibition in your post, Peter!
Great photos, too!
I can see you had much work in this post.
Many thanks!

Mo said...

Great post. I can't get to the exhibition but you've given a wonderful glimpse into the gallery.

caterpillar said...

Loved the first picture the best...and such beautiful paintings...

Catherine said...

what a truly rich cultural post - stunning!

joanny said...

Peter:

Bravo, wonderful photo's and comments, as I am a student lover of art history, I enjoyed this very much.

joanny

Jeanie said...

Oh, Peter -- I do wish this exhibition was on when I will be there! I love his work -- have seen a good deal at d'Orsay there and that wonderful grayish one with a flatiron building behind it over here! The collection of accepted/rejected is fascinating. I read a book called "Luncheon of the Boating Party" a year or two ago, about Renoir doing that painting -- fictionalized, I know, though it looks reasonably well researched -- and learned more of Caillebotte's legacy. To see it really makes an amazing impact. Thanks for sending me the link.