26.11.15

Dancing in the rain...


I went to Parc Monceau (see previous post) the other day. It was raining. At a distance I saw what looked like a dancing couple. It actually was, but they were not moving…

This is a statue by the American artist Seward Johnson, known for his life-size bronze statues, possibly a bit “kitch”, but interesting. Three of his statues are temporarily exhibited in the main path in Parc Monceau, all three related to French painters.

The dancing couple is a 3D version of Renoir’s “Dance at Bougival” from 1883. It’s a pleasure to get a closer look of Suzanne Valadon. (I wrote often about here, see e.g. here.)

There are two other statues to be seen.

This one is referring to another Renoir painting, “Two sisters” from 1881…

… and this one to Manet’s “In the conservatory” from 1879.


Seward Johnson is exhibited in a large number of museums, but some of his – sometimes giant – statues can also be found outdoors.    
            

9 comments:

Virginia said...

Oh i"m so jealous you found this! :)
V

Anne in Oxfordshire said...

Always something new to be found. How wonderful. Take care Anne.

JudyMac said...

Are the Seward Johnson statues relatively new to Parc Monceau? I covered quite a bit of PM in 2012, and I know I didn't see it all, but certainly didn't see these statues. I think they are quite entertaining, even if they are a bit kitschy for Parc Monceau.

claude said...

Génial ! J'adore !
J'avais déjà la photo du milieu des trois dernières.

Thérèse said...

Bravo pour la trouvaille.

Anonymous said...

Love the photos! So beautiful and so romantic!
Thank you.
Maria

Shammickite said...

Beautiful, I love them. I'd like to dance in that lovely park too!!!!

Jeanie said...

I love this, Peter. Three of my favorite paintings, too! I just saw a documentary about ransacked paintings during WWII and that Manet was one that was rescued by the Monuments Men in their search for stolen art. Fun to see a different interpretation!

joanny said...

Only In Paris is there to be found, the past recreating itself and speaks to itself through the language and the beauty of the soul of art.