7.4.10

Cour Damoye

Before leaving the Bastille area (see preceding post), I thought we should have a look at Cour Damoye. Like along the neighbouring Rue du Faubourg Saint Antoine (see previous post), you will find a number of small alleys and courtyards in this area and this is one of them.

Cour Damoye opens directly (via a porch) to Place de la Bastille. Suddenly you leave all the noise…

It would of course have been better to show you this little passage when the leaves and flowers are around.

39 comments:

Trotter said...

Hi Peter! So, you're back to the Cours... ;)
Excellent shots!

Vagabonde said...

That is a neat looking alley that I’ll have to investigate next time I am in Paris. Have you been to one, I think it is close to la rue du Faubourg Montmartre ou un peu plus loin, and they have Turkish restaurants there?
Also Peter I have to tell you that quite a while back je suis allée sur le site de Invisible Paris et je lis les posts regulièrement. Et bien il y a quelques jours il parlait d’un livre, genre série noire, écrit par une américaine de San Francisco (l’histoire ce passe dans le Marais.) J’ai le premier livre de la série et je suis déçue. J’ai écrit un long commentaire (trop long!) sur le site de Invisible Paris il y a quelques instants. Mais je vais continuer de lire le livre de Cara Black en essayant de ne pas penser aux noms des gens dans ce livre.

Thérèse said...

Then you'll have to go back for the leaves and flowers...
Décidement on ne met plus d'accent sur les majuscules nulle part! (thé/café)
Beaucoup de charme cette cour Damoye!

Simony said...

Yes, that was my first try with wallpaper! I am very proud of myself!

I loved this alley, I would not mind having an office there.
My true dream?? To go to Paris by myself and explore the city without a hurry. It must be wonderful to be alone in places like this.

Cheryl said...

That's the kind of alley I love running into while wandering around Paris. Hopefully the the/cafe place is as charming as the street it's on.

V Rakesh said...

Excellent pictures! Its good to see that architecture is very well preserved and taken good care of!

joanny said...

Peter

It is all in the details -- if there were flowers blooming I would have missed the lovely details you show -- my focus was on the small fountain -- the dark green rose pattern over the door, the beautiful hanging lanterns , the iron works and the cobbled or stone path ways -- the Ambiance of the alley and the wonderful little shop signs -- making note to self to go and visit them in the future..

I am following you around Paris -- Peter through your great photography.

Merci
Joanny

amatamari© said...

Oh beautiful charm of the streets ...
:-)
I really like this aspect of Paris: magnificent photos, thanks for sharing!

Carole said...

Bonjour Peter,
Merci pour la balade, je ne connais de ce quartier que les 15/20...
bises et bonne journée !

Polly said...

So many wonderful places to explore - thanks for bringing them to us! I will be back in May, living just off of rue St. Antoine so I will make it a point to find this charming "cour" that I have missed.

hpy said...

Mention spéciale pour toi (et Lyliane) sur mon post ce matin. Mais ce n'est ni un prix, ni un tag.

Bionen promenade cours Darmoy.

Olivier said...

j'aime beaucoup ces cours (ou plustot des passages) dans Paris, on a l'impression d'un petit Labyrinthe Parisien

ALAIN said...

Il y a beaucoup de cours dans ce quartier, certaines ouvertes, d'autres fermées. C'est toujours agréable de s'y promener.

claude said...

Un coin de Paris tranquille et tout mignon. J'aime ces cours, elles ont un charme fou.

Catherine said...

Oui mais les fleurs et ls feuilles auraient détourné notre attention des façades pittoresques qui ressemblent à d'anciens ateliers.
Paris a réussi à se ménager de petits havre de paix que, bien des fois, tu trouves et partages avec nous.

Cergie said...

C'est une des nombreuses cours d'à toi ?
En fait je crois que tu es un chat, tu adores aller dans tous les recoins plus ou moins défendus... Et ton blog te sert de marqueur indélébile...

ParisBreakfasts said...

I'm THERE with that first picture...and I feel a clutch in my throat...then the tears start...

Adam said...

Sometimes I think there are too many 'cours' like this one in Paris. They are attractive of course, but because they are not 'unique' they are perhaps not loved and used as much as they would be in less spoilt cities.

PattiKen said...

How charming. I could happily get lost in that warren of alleys and courtyards.

Starman said...

It's not always easy to remember to "smell the roses"; thankfully, we have you to remind us.

Abraham said...

Amazing that people actually know which is is the exit.

James said...

That looks like a good place to walk around with a camera.

JM said...

Such great details! The alley in the first pic is just lovely!

Catherine said...

it still looks so archetypally Paris - great shots...

Ruth said...

The white of Paris buildings always lifts my spirits.

I see that some are in light shirts/jackets, and some in down coats. Just like here! We have had warm weather, but now it will turn chilly again apparently.

Marie-Noyale said...

Tu as vraiment le don pour denicher des petits havres de paix dans le tumulte de la Capitale!!

the Armchair Parisian said...

This looks so charming ~ flowers or not. I will have to add to my list for my next trip...

ruma2008 said...

Le décor qui vous capture vraiment transparent.
Il leur semblait être juste en face de mes yeux.

Votre photo est magnifique sûrement.

Bonne fin de semaine.

De l'Extrême-Orient.
Meilleures salutations.
ruma

Jeanie said...

One thing I discovered in Paris was to always walk down the alleys -- you would find some amazing architecture, quaint shops and cafes and sometimes a good shortcut! I wish I'd found this one!

Peter said...

Trotter:
Yes! :-)

Vagabonde:
There are Turkish restaurants at many places, but I think perhaps more particularly on the area Rue du Faubourg St Denis, Boulevard de Strasbourg...
I will check what has been written on Paris Invisible. :-)

Thérèse:
OK. I will try to go back! :-)

Peter said...

Simony:
... and I thought I could join you! :-)

Cheryl:
We should try it! :-)

V Rakesh:
Yes, fortunatley! :-)

Peter said...

Joanny:
You are right; it's easier to see the buildings and the architecture before the leaves are there, but on the other hand, they add to the atmosphere! :-)

Amatamari:
Yes, Paris has (also) its charm! :-)

Carole:
Alors, il faut que tu y passes! :-)

Peter said...

Polly:
Nice to hear that you soon will be back! :-)

hpy:
Je suis allé voir sur ton blog! :-)

Olivier:
Bien, donc je ne suis pas seul! :-)

Peter said...

Alain:
En effet! :-)

Claude:
En effet! :-)

Catherine:
Oui, tu as raison... comme j'ai déjà commenté ci-dessus! :-)

Peter said...

Cergie:
Les fruits défendus...! :-)

ParisBreakfasts:
Did you miss this one? :-)

Adam:
There couldn't be too many of them !-)

Peter said...

PattiKen:
To be lost for a little while is OK! :-)

Starman:
At your service! :-)

Abraham:
Exits on both sides of the alley! :-)

Peter said...

James:
No doubt! :-)

JM:
So I picked the right one! :-)

Catherine:
Yes, at least this is one side of Paris! :-)

Peter said...

Ruth:
Yes, the temperature goes up and down at the moment! :-)

Marie-Noyale:
Je dois avouer que je les cherche! :-)

The Armchair Parisian:
Good then that I showed it! :-)

Peter said...

ruma2008:
Merci pour ces commentaires de l'Extrème Orient! :-)

Jeanie:
There are fortunately quite a lot of them! :-)