17.5.12

Music



If you are looking for an instrument (or want to have it restored), Rue de Rome is the place to go. There are some tens of instrument makers - instruments of all kinds. You find some of the most remarkable ones, used by leading instrumentalists, but pure amateurs (like me) are of course also welcome. You have also a number of shops where you can e.g. find a piano …







 ... or maybe just some piano scores (like me - I bought some scores on sale).



It’s so nice to see some of the instrument makers working behind the glasses. 



18 comments:

martinealison said...

Une publication musicale qui m'enchante...
De magnifiques photos en patchwork...
Gros bisous

Thérèse said...

Comme c'est beau et noble! Un plaisir pour les yeux.
Justement il me faudrait faire réparer le violon de ma maman... un jour prochain.
Bon déchiffrage de tes nouvelles partitions.

Pierre BOYER said...

Le quartier des musiciens...
Bonne journée,

Pierre

ALAIN said...

Le violon scié en deux, c'est pour faciliter le transport ?

French Girl in Seattle said...

Excellent photos. We visited Rue de Rome last summer when my mother-in-law decided to offer my 12-year old his first guitar. He spent the rest of the trip carrying it proudly on his back (the case was taller than he was!) I think I recognize the shop window in your collage. A bientôt. Veronique (French Girl in Seattle)

Thirtytwo degrees said...

Quite fascinating to post so many great photos of music shops...great idea!

Catherine said...

I love these specialist streets in cities - great colorful shots...do you play the piano?

Marguerite said...

J'ai bcp fréquenté cette rue lorsque mes enfants étaient au conservatoire : la Flute de Pan pour les partitions (tu montres un bout de la vitrine) la Guitareria pour les guitares et Feeling Musique pour les instruments à vent. Peut-être est ce là que tu as photographié les cuivres et le visage de Maurice André ?

Anonymous said...

I wonder if the Selmer shop is still in business...

I still remember the Selmer saxo tenor and clarinet my father brought from Paris for my brother so long ago...

Lovely post!
Lovely photos!

Maria

Anonymous said...

I will tell my Parisian friend where to find the score for Chopin´s Prelude Op.28 No.1 in C Major...

Thanks!
Maria

Shammickite said...

Alas, I am not musical at all, but I would love to wander down this street and look in all the shop windows. The only musical instrument I can play is the radio!!!!

Studio at the Farm said...

What a wonderful street, Peter. I do love the photo of the green violin! ;)

Starman said...

Ive been on Rue de Rome, but I can't remember why I was there or when.

claude said...

Tagada veux tu souffler dans ma trompette,tagada veux-tu souffler dans le....
J'ai fais du piano quand j'étais môme mais les gammes me gavaient et les arpèges aussi.
Ici il n'y a qu'un seule magasin de musique, mais il est bien achalandé.
C'est un beau métier que de fabriquer un instrument de musique ou le réparer.

Bettina said...

What a great theme for this post and wonderful photos as always.

Cezar and Léia said...

ahhh those pianos ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥
Léia

Jeanie said...

Peter, this brings back a flood of memories -- mostly of wandering about the shops and spending hours listening to Rick play guitars, trying to decide if there was a new one in his future (he decided not that day). The shop persons in all the places he played were generous with their time and letting him try different instruments. And, at a cafe called Lutetia on Edinbergh and Rome, I had the best omelet ever! It was a wonderful way to spend a rainy day in Paris! Thanks for bringing it back to my mind!

Anonymous said...

I wonder how long Rue de Rome has been the Musician's District... As a classical guitarist, I am of course acquainted with the publisher Max Eschig whose most famous composer (to guitarists anyhow) was Heiter Villa Lobos. The company still operates but Max himself is certainly long gone. Their address was 56 Rue de Rome starting probably in the 20s or 30s until who knows. I'll bet there were other publishers then and now, both famous and obscure. I wonder if it was the music district back in Couperin's time...
Rick Oberle