31.10.13

Jules Dalou

Jules Dalou (1838-1902) was a sculptor, with a remarkable production of which a number can still be found around Paris. Before giving some examples, maybe a few words about him.

He was born in Paris into a working-class family. He remained some kind of Republican socialist all his life, which e.g. forced him to take refuge in England 1871 - 1879. After all, he finally got full recognition, was chosen for some important works, was awarded the Grand Prix of the Exposition Universelle in 1889, was made commander of the Legion of Honour…

His most well-known monument is probably “The Triumph of the Republic”, which was installed on Place de la Nation (see previous post) in 1899. We can see the symbol of the Republic (Marianne?) standing on the top of the chariot of the Nation, drawn by lions, “guided by the Sprit of Freedom, surrounded by the symbols for labour (a blacksmith) and justice… and then the abundance is distributed”. (Not easy to reach this "perfection" when it comes to reality!)


(Nothing to do here, perhaps, but when I took the photos, I was charmed by this little group and the young photographer.)







In the Luxembourg Gardens (see previous posts) you can find (at least?) three of his works, including ‘The"Triumph of Silenius” (1885) and a more simple one, erected after Dalou’s death (in 1908), in memory of Auguste Scheurer-Kestner, industrial and politician (and active Drefuys-defender)…






… and this tribute to the painter Eugène Delacroix (1890). This reminds me about some paintings by Delacroix in the Saint Sulpice church (see previous post), which are in heavy need of restoration, obviously planned, but…


Along Avenue Foch (see previous post) there is since 1899 a tribute to Jean-Charles Alphand (1817-91), the creator of the Bois de Boulogne (see previous posts), Bois de Vincennes (see previous posts), Parc Monceau (see previous posts), Parc Montsouris (see previous post), , the Buttes de Chaumont (see previous post), the Champs-Elysées Gardens (see previous post), the Trocadéro Gardens (see previous post), the Temple Square (see previous post), “my” park, Square des Batignolles (see previous posts) and a lot more. Alphand is surrounded by some of his collaborators and in the right lower corner of this collage, we can see Dalou as seen by himself.


A different kind of monument can be found in a little park close to Porte Maillot, erected in 1907. It represents Emile Levassor (1843-97) winning the (the first ever?) automobile race, Paris-Bordeaux-Paris in 1895. (The monument was sketched by Dalou, but executed by Camille Lefèvre.)  Levassor was part of the Panhard-Levassor car manufacturer.



There are several epitaphs by Dalou in the Paris cemeteries, but the best known is perhaps this one of Victor Noir at the Père Lachaise cemetery (see previous post)   . (Victor Noir was an ordinary journalist, who is more known for his grave than for anything else: He was killed by a cousin to the Emperor Napoleon III. The sculpture of him gives the impression that he is sexually exited and it has become a fertility symbol…)


Here are some examples of Dalou works which can be found elsewhere, in museums...




12 comments:

Karin B (Do Overs in Denver) said...

Wonderful, Peter! Just saw you posted via Facebook, and I have not been over to read and say hello in a really long time.

I'm glad to know more about Dalou -- the Victor Noir one is so well-known, but it is true that I never gave it thought as to who might have sculpted it, and now I know!

Jean-Charles Alphand was also the creator of "my" Parc des Buttes Chaumont. I miss that park so much...

Here are greetings from Denver, Colorado, and thanks to you for bringing Paris to me with this post.

You take care, Peter!
Karin

Peter Olson said...

Nice to find you here again! You are right, I omitted the Buttes de Chaumont. (I added it to the post.)

martinealison said...

Bonjour Peter,

Après les graffitis, les sculptures sont à l'honneur.
Les merveilleuses sculptures qui jalonnent nos parcours sont incroyablement nombreuses. Beaucoup d'entre nous ne les remarquent pas malheureusement.
J'ai beaucoup apprécié ce billet sur Jules Dalou. Des photos et un reportage remarquable.

Gros bisous et un grand merci pour votre gentil petit mot.

Alain said...

" Dalou, le chantre des rondeurs républicaines" Tardi

claude said...

ça, c'est de la sculpture ou je ne m'y connais pas.
C'est quand même beaucoup plusss beau que ce qu'on fait maintenant.
A plus tard, Peter, je m'en va pour un mois.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for being a constant source of great information, so easily read and understood.
Always a pleasure to drop in.

Lucy

Olivier said...

superbe, comme toujours une belle decouverte

Anonymous said...

That first photo...

Is it the bust of Tayllerand´s son? The famous painter? The resemblance is remarkable.

Life is sweet in Paraguay, Peter!

Thank you for all of your wonderful posts...your fantastic photos!

Maria

Peter Olson said...

> Maria: It is!! (or supposed to be). :-)

Jeanie said...

What a prolific sculptor -- I love his figures. Very real, very "personable" with a good deal of soul. I wasn't familiar with Dalou -- thank you for the introduction!

Starman said...

I took a couple photos of “The Triumph of the Republic” when we visited the Nation area. I think everyone does.

Vagabonde said...

Dalou was a master – thanks for showing his art. This is one thing I miss here – not many statues around. You said that he was a “republican socialist” – my goodness – in the US they would hate that…