21.3.16

Luxembourg Gardens - statues


The Statue of Liberty is back in the Luxembourg Gardens. Actually it’s a new copy. The previous original one (offered by the creator, F.A. Bartholdi) stood here until 2012, when it was transferred to the Orsay Museum (see also previous post).
   
This is not the first time I have posted (see here) about the Luxembourg Gardens, but I wanted to make a more complete post on all (?) the sculptures you may find in this great park. Originally the park was initiated, in the beginning of the 17th century, by Marie de’ Medici, widow of King Henry IV, mother of Louis XIII and grandmother of Louis XIV. It surrounds the Luxembourg Palace (see previous posts here), now housing the French Senate.

But… maybe first some general pictures taken a rather cold day, early morning, with rather few people around.




Here is a view of the palace, the pond in front of it and some statues. 

This part of the park is surrounded by statues of a number of French Queens and some allegorical, symbolic figures. 


According to this detailed site created by the Senate, there are 106 statues around. I believe I found almost all of them. So, let's start with some more, the first one is called “Triomphe de Silène” by Jules Dalou (1838-1902) (see previous post) . We can also find a lion by Auguste Cain (1822-94) – a sculptor who is very present in the Tuileries Gardens (see here) -, an homage to the poet Paul Eluard by Ossip Zadkine (1890-1967)....  




I will not repeat what I previously wrote about the “Medici Fountain” (see here), which already has a number of decorative sculptures.
Many statues are dedicated to authors, composers, scientists, statesmen…

If you want to know more about these personalities, here are the links: Verlaine, Zweig, Baudelaire, Fabre, LePlay




De Heredia, Sainte Beuve, Mendes-France, Delacroix (another statue by Dalou)…


Many other personalities are portrayed on the facade of the Orangery.

Before leaving the park, maybe a look on what has been done for the future of the plants, the bees and other insects…



… and for the visually impaired.



At last, in the park you can also find a number of “Arago plates”, indicating the Paris meridian. (See previous post on the Paris Observatory.) 

6 comments:

lyliane said...

J'en ai photographié quelques unes quand je suis allée visiter le Sénat.

Jeanie said...

Good grief, Peter! I think you found everything! I feel like such a slacker, knowing I didn't see a quarter of these during my time in this beautiful garden! Next time I'll have to take am uch closer look!

Lucy said...

Thanks again for all the detailed research and great photos.

Lucy

Anonymous said...

La importancia cultural de este destacado punto de referencia es abrumadora.
Gracias por tan brillante articulo.
Mabel

claude said...

Comme je l'aime ce jardin. Terrain de jeux de mon enfance . Il est beau, culturel. Il plait autant au petits qu'au grands. Et il y a du beau monde dans ce jardin.

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